The assigned to a parenting program, intervention

The second
article published in 2002 about : ” Effect of Maternal
Confidence on Breastfeeding Duration: An Application of Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy
Theory”

      The aim of this study was to assess the effect
of maternal confidence (breastfeeding self-efficacy) on breastfeeding duration.
A prospective survey method was conducted with 300 women in the last trimester
of pregnancy recruited from the antenatal clinic of a large hospital in
Australia.  It applied by telephone
interviews from 1 week to 4 month  postpartum to assess infant feeding methods
and breastfeeding confidence using the Breastfeeding Self-Efficacy Scale.

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      The study
conclude the Results by Mothers with high breastfeeding self-efficacy were
significantly more likely to be breastfeeding, and doing so exclusively, at 1
week and 4 months postpartum than mothers with low breastfeeding self-efficacy.
So maternal breastfeeding self-efficacy has a big role for predictor of
breastfeeding duration and level. Integrating self-efficacy improving
strategies may enhance the quality of care that health care professionals
deliver and may increase a new mother’s confidence in her ability to
breastfeed.

     The third article published in 2013 about:”
Social Learning Theory Parenting Intervention Promotes Attachment-Based Care giving
in Young Children: Randomized Clinical Trial”

       The
aim of  study examined the spread to
which a social learning theory– based treatment enhance change in qualities of
parent–child relationship derived from attachment theory. The method that
a randomized clinical trial of 174 (4-6) year-olds selected from a high-need
urban. were assigned to a parenting program, intervention group was (N=88) or
nonintervention condition (N=86). Three tasks: (a) free play, (b) challenge
task, and (c) tidy up were assessed in home observations of parent–child
interactions.

      The findings evidence that standard social
learning theory when applied parenting interventions can modify and change broader
aspects of parent–child relationship quality and increase clinical and
conceptual questions about the uniqueness of existing treatment models in
parenting research.