“The the NCAA championship with a record long

“The measure of life is not what life accomplishes but rather… the impact that life has on others” quote from Jackie Robinson. His legacy changed many lives. Jackie Robinson was one of the greatest baseball players of all time and his accomplishments led to increased equality for the blacks. He was born on January 31st, 1919 in Cairo, Georgia (Wikipedia.org). He was the youngest born of 5 children. He ended up only living there for a short amount of time because his father left them. Then he moved to Pasadena, California. His family was very poor. They lived in a under average house in a neighborhood. Robinson joined a neighborhood gang because he was discluded from all activities. After graduating from his previous high school, he enrolled at John Muir High School. He played 4 sports, football, baseball, basketball, and track, and lettered in all of them. After graduating he joined Pasadena Junior college. He continued playing the same sports very well. After that he enrolled at UCLA. He became the schools first athlete to letter in 4 sports. He won the NCAA championship with a record long jump of 24 feet and 10.25 inches. Surprisingly Robinsons worst sport at UCLA was baseball. He hit a .097 in his only season. He left UCLA right before graduation to follow his football career, but after the attack on Pearl Harbor, his football career was over. In 1942, Robinson was drafted into war. In january 1943 he was commissioned 2nd lieutenant. His military career suddenly came to a halt after an unfortunate event on July 6, 1944. He fought in a battle. After the military, he joined Sam Huston College. In 1945 Robinson played professional baseball in the negro leagues. He decided to accept a contract for $400 per month but he ended up not having a good experience with the Monarchs, even though he played very well. The Boston Red Sox held a tryout for Robinson and other black players on April 16th, but they were not serious about having a black man on their team. Robinson left the tryout humiliated. There were other teams that were actually serious about having a black ballplayer on their team. Branch Ricky agreed to sign Robinson to the Royals. The signing of Robinson to the Royals was publicly announced on October 23rd (Wikipedia.org). On March 17th, 1946 Robinson played his first game as a Royal against the teams parent team the Dodgers. It had been a long time since someone had seen a black person play in the minor leagues. Finally, Robinson had ended segregation in baseball.  Unexpectedly, 6 days before the start of the 1947 season, Robinson got called up by the Dodgers to play in the major leagues with them. On April 5th, in front of a huge crowd of 26,623 spectators Robinson played his first game in the major leagues. He broke the color line. This was a giant step to more equality for the blacks. The Dodgers won 5-3. Black fans began watching the Dodgers abandoning their negro leagues. He was a great ballplayer, but there was a lot of tension. Some of his teammates refused to play by his side. Fans and other players said many racist things to him. Some of his teammates began defending Robinson. The national league president told everyone that anyone who strikes against him will be suspended.  Robinson played 151 games that season. He had a batting average of .297, and he had 175 hits. His astonishing performance earned him the rookie of the year award in 1947. He had 133 double plays in the 1950 season which made the record. He finished the year with 99 runs scored a .378 batting average. The only big win he had was the 1955 world series against their rivals the New York Yankees. Robinson decided to end his baseball career after the 1956 season. Robinsons career in the major league ended about 60 years of segregation in professional baseball. His hard work and achievements led the blacks step by step closer to equality. He was an astonishing athlete, and a hero to all black people. Jackie Robinson was one of the greatest baseball players of all time and his accomplishments led to increased equality for the blacks.