These countries, these organizations have got normally vested

These goals are taken into account because of the pressures from the formal organisations which in the new states have grown in large number. These formal organisations appear to have come up in the shape of ‘western model’ such as political parties, public and private corporations, legislatures, trade unions, associations, etc.

In the developing countries, these organizations have got normally vested interests and are often dominated by the person who is either in the political parties or bureaucracy. These organizations appear to serve the interests of their leaders rather than of their members.

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In the developed system the argument is quite the reverse. Here organizations enhance the interests of their own members and mobilise the skills and energies of members for coordinated action who tend to control the surrounding environment.

They contribute much to further development. But in countries which take effective organizations, development seems to be impeded in its planned action. Developing societies must develop such organizations as are capable of sustaining improvements in their organised activities.

In conclusion, it may be stated that the three dimensions of development political, social and economic are quite inter-related to each other in their contexts of development administration.

The political context of development administration stresses the need of balance between politics and administration, the economic context emphasises rise in national income per capita and social context, demands improvement in the well-being of the people which in the final analysis is the ultimate goal of development.

Riggs concludes, “Suffice it to say that one way of judging the level of development of a society or social system may be the degree to which it exhibits the characteristics of balanced polity, organisational maturity, and the prevalence of a salary system in its bureaucracies”.