Description research principle of CBPR on the

Description
of a specific health issue in a select community of interest:

In the United States, overweight and
obesity have reached epidemic proportions. 
149.3 million Americans over the age of 20 are overweight or obese
(Mabachi, 2012).  They can combat
overweight and obesity by consuming unprocessed, healthy, fresh foods daily.  Unfortunately all Americans do not have the
same access these foods (Mabachi, 2012). 
The communities that often have limited access to unprocessed, fresh
foods include: low-income, minority, and urban neighborhoods.    

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Description
of one principle of CBPR that can be applied to the community you selected:

The principle of CBPR
that can be applied to overweight and obesity is cyclical and iterative research.  This type of research includes the following
steps: “partnership development and maintenance, community assessment, problem
definition, development of research methodology, data collection and analysis,
interpretation of data, determination of action and policy implications,
dissemination of results, action taking (as appropriate), specification of
learnings, and establishment of mechanisms for sustainability” (Coreil, 2009,
p. 277).  Cyclical and iterative research
should ideally work in a circular pattern, as one problem is resolved, other
issues requiring attention are identified through research, and the process
begins again. (Coreil, 2009, p. 277)

 

Explanation
of how this principle can inform interventions to alleviate health disparities
for your community. 

Using the cyclical and iterative
research principle of CBPR on the Argentine neighborhood of Kansas City,
Kansas, can help combat overweight and obesity in low-income, minority, urban
neighborhoods by improving access to healthy, fresh foods (Mabachi, 2012).  Some examples are: establish the food needs
of the community by conducting a door-to-door Community Foods Assessment
Survey; involve residents in community-wide talks to solicit ideas and identify
community strengths and weaknesses to improving access to healthy, culturally
appropriate foods; and synthesize key ideas and strategies into a business plan
for the community to use as part of their overall strategy to improve access to
healthy foods (Mabachi, 2012).

 

 

References:

Coreil, J. (Ed.). (2009). Social and
behavioral foundations of public health (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Mabachi, N. M., & Kimminau, K. S.
(2012). Leveraging community-academic partnerships to improve healthy food
access in an urban, Kansas City, Kansas, community. Progress in Community
Health Partnerships, 6(3), 279–288.